Scottish independence

I know nothing about it, but I’m for it. “If the entire political class are convinced that Scottish independence will be a disaster, then I think we can be reasonably certain it will prove a boon…”

Here’s my touchstone; if everybody on both sides of the aisle is for it, whatever it is, it will do me no good. If a large bipartisan coalition of responsible congressmen and senators is against it, whatever it is, then I’m for it.

The business plan behind illegal immigration

Who says business innovation is dead in America?

For years now, it has seemed like there was no business legal in the US that required lots of illegal immigrants. But lookee, there has been just such a business – a whole industry – for years. Right now it’s dominated by DCCC, but NRCC is working hard to catch up.

The lie of “immigration reform”

The lie is the assumption that, once current illegals get their legalization, pro-immigrant activists in both parties will continue to support the second half of the bargain, the increased security.

The chaos in Texas shows they won’t. Faced with a clear hole in the border – with a wave of tens of thousands of undocumented Central Americans crossing into the U.S. in order to get in line for hearings years from now, which they likely won’t attend while they continue to live here – pro-reform activists have scrambled, not to show their border security bona fides, but to generate arguments and outbursts designed to let the new wave stay. — Lie at Heart of “Immigration Reform” Exposed

Many reformers do not really want to stop illegal immigration. They want illegal immigrants, because their business plans rely on illegal immigrants. Legal residents would not do the work unless their employers paid what they would have to pay legal residents to do the same work.

And let me add, if your business plan is predicated on hiring illegals, that’s not good business; that’s organized crime, whether you’re a fruit grower, a restaurant owner, or a non-profit.

Free shots

Caution: this makes no sense

Why contraceptives? Why not require Walmart, Costco, and, what the heck, Home Depot, to provide a free flu shot not only for employees, but for anyone who wants one? In fact, why not make every hardware store provide free vaccines for everyone – regular childhood shots, tetanus boosters, shingles, the whole lot.

This part makes some sense

In fact, when people cross our border illegally, the first thing the border patrol should do – whether they afterwards send them back to Guatemala or send them on to Toronto (why not?) – the first thing the border patrol should do is shoot them full of vaccines.

UPDATE 11 July 2014: Charles Pergiel has related thoughts on the Supreme Court and mass media.

Socially conscious corporation

“One such company was hailed last year by the left-wing policy website Demos ‘for thumbing its nose at the conventional wisdom that success in the retail industry’ requires paying ‘bargain-basement wages.’ A retail chain with nearly 600 stores and 13,000 workers, this business sets its lowest full-time wage at $15 an hour, and raised wages steadily through the stagnant postrecession years. (Its do-gooder policies also include donating 10 percent of its profits to charity and giving all employees Sunday off.) And the chain is thriving commercially – offering, as Demos put it, a clear example of how ‘doing good for workers can also mean doing good for business.'” — A Company Liberals Could Love, by Ross Douthat

Crazy talk

The gods must be crazy

“Another savage trait of our time is the disposition to talk about material substances instead of about ideas. The old civilisation talked about the sin of gluttony or excess. We talk about the Problem of Drink – as if drink could be a problem. When people have come to call the problem of human intemperance the Problem of Drink, and to talk about curing it by attacking the drink traffic, they have reached quite a dim stage of barbarism. The thing is an inverted form of fetish worship; it is no sillier to say that a bottle is a god than to say that a bottle is a devil. The people who talk about the curse of drink will probably progress down that dark hill. In a little while we shall have them calling the practice of wife-beating the Problem of Pokers; the habit of housebreaking will be called the Problem of the Skeleton-Key Trade; and for all I know they may try to prevent forgery by shutting up all the stationers’ shops by Act of Parliament.” — G.K. Chesterton, Humanitarianism and Strength, in All Things Considered, 1909

Make paper illegal to stop forgery? Nah, that’d be crazy.