Don’t know much about history

Particularly California history:

“Originally, [Mision San Francisco de Assis / Mission Dolores in San Francisco] comprised a fairly vast area, with 10,000 head of cattle, 10,000 sheep, many horses, etc., as well as workshops, farms and gardens. In a very real sense, it was San Francisco. Several thousand native Americans lived and worked there. Following Mexican independence, in 1834 the missions were ‘secularized’ meaning, in effect, that all their lands except that upon which stood the church buildings and cemeteries were seized by the Mexican government and given to private citizens. This impoverished the mission and lead to a decades long decline. By 1842, only a few Indians lived at the mission, and what remained of the building fell into serious disrepair.”

There’s an article in Wikipedia, I don’t know how accurate, about the Mexican secularization act of 1833.

The 1986 movie The Mission, with Robert DeNiro and Jeremy Irons, takes place a hundred years earlier on another continent. King Henry’s dissolution of monasteries was a couple of hundred years before that.

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Toy guns

“This isn’t even about guns. For a child that age, guns have nothing to do with danger, or violence — much of the fascination has to do with remote control. I can stand over here, and change the state of that object, clear over there. This might be a curious thing for someone to bring up about it, but we should be discussing that aspect of it more often because far from being merely harmless, that’s an important part of a child’s development. Children have a need to become accustomed to achieving direct effect on the world around them; getting comfortable with the idea of engaging action, as a leader, on an individual level, and seeing that action translated into a consequence. Later on they can become acquainted with the concept of irreversible investments, and point-of-commitment. What you do today, you cannot undo tomorrow. From that, comes the understanding of responsibility.” — The Next Thing to Destory: Toy Guns

http://www.peekinthewell.net/blog/the-next-thing-to-destory-toy-guns/

Hepatitis outbreak shows…

California’s hepatitis A outbreak shows why people need easy access to health care” says the headline.

I don’t think that’s what California’s hepatitis outbreak shows.

This article, San Diego Washing Streets With Bleach To Combat Hepatitis A Outbreak, notes that the hepatitis “has largely infected homeless people in the coastal California city,” and that “part of the issue is an apparent shortage of public restrooms.”

That’s still not quite it, but closer than I expected NPR to go.

UPDATE: I don’t know if this is an accurate description, or if it’s related to anything else, but Mike Hudak says “there is something seriously disturbing about the situation in San Francisco that must not be ignored.”

Still, it’s not all doom and gloom. The Boy Scouts is going to let girls join. At this point with the Boy Scouts, the worse the better. If the organization is going to go under, let it go quickly. Having girls join will hasten its demise, and maybe encourage the development of other organizations for boys.

What’s a dollar’s worth?

“The truth is that along with real economic progress there has been a parallel big degradation in the lived experience of life in much of America, a part of America largely invisible to and certainly not relatable to on a visceral level by most of those in booming sections of global cities. I’m all in favor of understanding the very real way that technology and other innovations have made our lives better, and fully capturing that in statistics. But we need to be equally as diligent in capturing and measuring the downsides of those trends, an effort I’ve read much less about in the papers.” — How Much Value Do Economists Assign to Having Married Parents Who Aren’t on Drugs?

A pre-1965 silver dollar might be worth roughly ten dollars today, so you could say our money has lost ninety percent of its value. On the other hand, what would a modest 2017 Dell computer have cost in 1965? Six hundred dollars today doubling every eighteen months back to 1965 comes to some figure in scientific notation. On yet another hand, in 1965 my father was married to my mother and lived in the house with us – a common arrangement in those days, somewhat less so today.

Intersectionality or bust

Just scanning along on a quiet Sunday afternoon … blah blah blah … Tolkein … Kalamazoo…

Hmm, some connection there? Scan more slowly…

“…wrote this at a roundtable for Homonationalisms at Kalamazoo last year…”

So I missed it. The roundtable for Homonationalisms has come and gone, without me. And it was in Kalamazoo! I might have taken the train, and heard the conductor cry “Kalamazoo! Winnetka!”

Maybe next year it’ll be in Cucamonga.

Seems apropos somehow

“Suppose that a great commotion arises in the street about something, let us say a lamp-post, which many influential persons desire to pull down. A grey-clad monk, who is the spirit of the Middle Ages, is approached upon the matter, and begins to say, in the arid manner of the Schoolmen, “Let us first of all consider, my brethren, the value of Light. If Light be in itself good–” At this point he is somewhat excusably knocked down. All the people make a rush for the lamp-post, the lamp-post is down in ten minutes, and they go about congratulating each other on their unmediaeval practicality. But as things go on they do not work out so easily. Some people have pulled the lamp-post down because they wanted the electric light; some because they wanted old iron; some because they wanted darkness, because their deeds were evil. Some thought it not enough of a lamp-post, some too much; some acted because they wanted to smash municipal machinery; some because they wanted to smash something. And there is war in the night, no man knowing whom he strikes. So, gradually and inevitably, to-day, to-morrow, or the next day, there comes back the conviction that the monk was right after all, and that all depends on what is the philosophy of Light. Only what we might have discussed under the gas-lamp, we now must discuss in the dark.” — Heretics, by G.K. Chesterton