Happy Columbus Day!

Five hundred twenty-six years ago today, on October 12, 1492, Christopher Columbus discovered America. Here’s some celebratory music:

Update

Big tech problems, and Big Tech problems, are limiting what I can do online, but I have a paper copy of Deschooling Society, by Ivan Illich. It’s a mix of acute observation and nonsense, but worth reading.

The views of Anthony Esolen’s father, in Faith, Family, Government, & the Company Store, are almost exactly those of my father.

Don’t know much about history

Particularly California history:

“Originally, [Mision San Francisco de Assis / Mission Dolores in San Francisco] comprised a fairly vast area, with 10,000 head of cattle, 10,000 sheep, many horses, etc., as well as workshops, farms and gardens. In a very real sense, it was San Francisco. Several thousand native Americans lived and worked there. Following Mexican independence, in 1834 the missions were ‘secularized’ meaning, in effect, that all their lands except that upon which stood the church buildings and cemeteries were seized by the Mexican government and given to private citizens. This impoverished the mission and lead to a decades long decline. By 1842, only a few Indians lived at the mission, and what remained of the building fell into serious disrepair.”

There’s an article in Wikipedia, I don’t know how accurate, about the Mexican secularization act of 1833.

The 1986 movie The Mission, with Robert DeNiro and Jeremy Irons, takes place a hundred years earlier on another continent. King Henry’s dissolution of monasteries was a couple of hundred years before that.

Toy guns

“This isn’t even about guns. For a child that age, guns have nothing to do with danger, or violence — much of the fascination has to do with remote control. I can stand over here, and change the state of that object, clear over there. This might be a curious thing for someone to bring up about it, but we should be discussing that aspect of it more often because far from being merely harmless, that’s an important part of a child’s development. Children have a need to become accustomed to achieving direct effect on the world around them; getting comfortable with the idea of engaging action, as a leader, on an individual level, and seeing that action translated into a consequence. Later on they can become acquainted with the concept of irreversible investments, and point-of-commitment. What you do today, you cannot undo tomorrow. From that, comes the understanding of responsibility.” — The Next Thing to Destory: Toy Guns

http://www.peekinthewell.net/blog/the-next-thing-to-destory-toy-guns/

Hepatitis outbreak shows…

California’s hepatitis A outbreak shows why people need easy access to health care” says the headline.

I don’t think that’s what California’s hepatitis outbreak shows.

This article, San Diego Washing Streets With Bleach To Combat Hepatitis A Outbreak, notes that the hepatitis “has largely infected homeless people in the coastal California city,” and that “part of the issue is an apparent shortage of public restrooms.”

That’s still not quite it, but closer than I expected NPR to go.

UPDATE: I don’t know if this is an accurate description, or if it’s related to anything else, but Mike Hudak says “there is something seriously disturbing about the situation in San Francisco that must not be ignored.”

Still, it’s not all doom and gloom. The Boy Scouts is going to let girls join. At this point with the Boy Scouts, the worse the better. If the organization is going to go under, let it go quickly. Having girls join will hasten its demise, and maybe encourage the development of other organizations for boys.