Thought experiment

What true thing can you not safely say, unless you say it anonymously?

Comments are off.

This video is vulgar, kind of stupid, and has significant philosophical limitations, but I still like it: Die Gedanken sind frei

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Stabat Mater

Stabat Mater, by JERYCHO

Aesthetics and story

Why Everything Must be CGI

Did Thulsa Doom lie to Conan, or did he tell him the truth?

UPDATE 9 February 2018: Zen Conan

The riddle of steel is like the sound of one hand clapping. Thulsa Doom learns it by direct experience. It’s the only thing Thulsa Doom will believe: it takes an Atlantean blade from an old king’s horde in the side of his neck to tell him.

Conan faces his own challenge. Having killed Thulsa Doom, does he take his place? No. He remains Coana. I don’t say he’s right, just that he’s Conan.

Star Trek

Not a review

We’d been out to dinner, and the pilot of Star Trek: Discovery was well in progress when I turned on the tv. I watched for a couple of minutes and thought, “eh, I’ve seen this one,” and surfed on by. No idea really what it’s about (the exec was hollering at the captain about the pressing need to attack the Klingons) but it seemed predictable and a bit tedious. That’s not fair, of course, since I didn’t actually watch the show. I’ve enjoyed the recent Star Trek movies that I’ve seen, but maybe the franchise has passed me by. I’m sure they’ve got a target demographic, and equally sure it doesn’t include me.

Idiot plot

Not a tale told by an idiot, but a tale told of idiots:

“…an idiot plot is ‘a plot which is kept in motion solely by virtue of the fact that everybody involved is an idiot’ and where the story would otherwise be over if this were not the case.” — seen at Idiot Plot

Carols

In Gaudete the second verse

Ezechielis porta
Clausa pertransitur.
Unde lux est orta
Salus invenitur.

is a reference to Ezekiel 44:1-4. Everybody likely to listen to Christmas carols in Latin probably already knew this, but it was new to me.

I hadn’t heard Il Est Ne, Le Divin Enfant, from here, for many years.

Continuing the French theme, here’s Noël Nouvelet sung by Lorenna McKennitt.

Finally one in English: Shepherds Arise, by the Richard Huish College Folk Quire.